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About Philippa Kennealy

Philippa Kennealy MD MPH CPCC PCC is The Entrepreneurial MD Business Coach who wants to help you build your business!
meet Philippa>>>

 

 

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Recommended Books and Programs
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    Using blogs, podcasts, viral products etc to reach your target market

  • Concierge Medicine: A New System to Get the Best Healthcare
    Concierge Medicine: A New System to Get the Best Healthcare
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  • The Medical Practice Start-Up Guide
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Friday
Apr132012

Networking your way efficiently to a new non-clinical position

I recently received this communication via my other website (Women Leaving Medicine) and thought it pointed enough of a question and commentary that I decided to share a portion of it and my response with you.

“I am the primary bread winner in our family.  We have two boys - 3 and 1.  My husband is going back to school for his Masters while he also juggles being the primary care giver for our boys.  I left emergency medicine almost three years ago and did a preceptorship in treating a disease that is medical as well as cosmetic.

I now work for a big corporation and the job allows me to be home nights, weekends, and holidays (which was not possible in the ER).  For that I am grateful.  Ironically I make more now than I did in the ER when I was actually saving lives.  We live modestly and try and save as much money as we can. 

I feel like I have exchanged the crappy ER hours and feeling unsafe in a busy violent urban ER for now being in corporate medicine’s grip. 

I am still amazed at the complete disregard for ethics and the patient-doctor relationship - all for the sake of making money.  I fight and try and stand my ground as firmly as possible but I don’t know how much longer I can keep up the fight.  I really hate that these people can be like this. My gut is telling me to leave.  I have always been good about listening to my gut and know that doing so ensures my happiness in life. 

My question is - how do I find a non-clinical job that will pay me at least enough to support my family while my husband finishes school? 

My interests are in public health, women’s health, international health, politics, policy making, advocacy, the environment and its effect on our health and our children’s health.  I would love to eventually go back to school for a Master’s in International Public Service and work for an NGO or start my own someday- of course, that is on hold until the kids grow a bit and my husband finishes school.

 Any advice or networking leads?”

I initially responded this way (I’ve elaborated some since I’ve had time to think more about it):

Dear X,

One of your best tools to securing work in your areas of passion is your Internet access. You can begin by doing the following:

  • Thoroughly research the organizations and companies whose mission and work truly appeal to you – play Internet Detective, scouring out the information you really want to know.
  • Find out who the key players are in your area of interest. Who are the speakers? Who are the authors? Who is most widely quoted in the press? What are they saying or writing? You are on the path to identifying your next heroes … or mentors!
  • Develop your LinkedIn profile, in which you express your interests, along with your experience.
  • Become a LinkedIn "super-user" - there is a ton of info out there on how to maximize your use of LinkedIn.
  • Using LinkedIn, reach out to those key players or folks in the organization whose profiles you can find on LinkedIn or in other places (try Facebook or Google+) and begin to create relationships. Please note: - This is very different from asking for a job. It is about finding mutual interests, giving, giving, giving - being an excellent listener, making people aware of useful resources, sharing things...
  • Do all of this actively, and over time, you will be able to target the places you truly want to work it AND have the people working there begin to KNOW, LIKE and TRUST you. That, at its core, is the basis for getting asked to join organizations.

Since then, I came across this post that I truly believe says it all -- 3 Simple Steps to Making Money From Any Passion by Scott Dinsmore.

So I would add – Don’t be afraid of your passion, and don’t spend the rest of your one precious life wishing for a different one.

Monday
Mar122012

Successful book writing secrets for aspiring physician writers

I confess that I have long fantasized about writing a book, along with learning Italian and learning to play the piano, or reconnecting with my adolescent guitar-playing self  ... for now the fantasies have to remain just that. I guess this blog is my creative outlet for the near future!

But for those of you for whom writing a book is a pressing or deeply engaging matter, the news is good. Help is at hand.

My "Insights from the Professionals" conversation today is with Lisa Tener, a book writing coach, published author, blogger and speaker who is passionate about helping aspiring authors get their message out by helping them write a book and get published.

Not only does she have her own company, but she also serves on the faculty of the Harvard Medical School continuing education course of writing and publishing books.

Lisa is a whiz at what she does - she has helped several of my clients figure out how to express themselves and their expertise or ideas through the written word, and we talk about some of her book-writing success strategies, such as:

... how to overcome those blocks to getting started
... how to know if you really have a book in you
... how to get a first draft done is as little as 8 weeks
... and much more! 

Lisa is about to launch yet another of her excellent Bring Your Book to Life programs ... designed to walk you through the process of getting your first draft written by the end of the program. It is the one that several of my clients have participated in and used to get their books written and comes highly recommended by them.

Note: She has generously offered a 40% discount for my readers for the class if using the paid in full option, using the coupon code "SAVE40". This is only available until 3/20/2012 so act quickly if you want a considerable savings.

Listen to my conversation with Lisa and then return here to add your comments or questions.

Monday
Feb272012

The general surgeon who sculpted a new physician career

Kathy Stecco MD is the poster child for the physician career of the next generation.

A general surgeon who trained at Stanford in the hotbed of Silicon Valley innovation, Dr Stecco was soon lured into the world of medical device due diligence, biotechnology startups and venture capital.

Encouraged and aided by remarkable mentors, Dr Tom Fogarty of Fogarty catheter fame, and entrepreneur and venture capitalist Mir Imran, she transitioned into co-founding four medical device startup companies, with plans for more in the near future. 

Talk about the patchwork physician career of the future!

She maintains a small concierge-style medical practice to "keep her hand in", while consulting, maintaining her role as an entrepreneurial physician and business owner, and staying sane through her passion for mixed martial arts. Additionally she spends part of the year traveling while supervising global clinical trials.

Listen to my interview with this successful physician entrepreneur and then return to share your thoughts and comments.

And if you would like to be in touch with Dr Stecco to learn more, her email is kathysteccomd@gmail.com.

Friday
Feb242012

Are the physician careers we know today becoming endangered?

As a child, the only physician I ever knew was our crusty opinionated and entirely trustworthy family doc. His physician career spanned almost five decades, in one unbroken line from his first days as a GP in solo practice until his retirement, which occurred way past the age at which most of us would like to stop working. 

His was the typical physician career, representing continuity, professional satisfaction and a lifelong commitment to a largely stable community of patients.

The other physician I know and admire greatly for these same qualities is my husband, a urologist, who still loves what he does and wouldn't trade away any of his doctoring in practice for an alternative.

However, I am going to take a provocative stance and argue that these kinds of physician careers, and the men and women, who have created them are a dying breed.

  • Technology has changed the way we work and interact, permitting unprecedented mobility, flexibility and instant access
  • Healthcare organizations, and the healthcare industry in general, are undergoing sea changes that are upsetting the traditional medical practice model and introducing enormous uncertainty
  • The younger generations have come to expect more out of their careers - more gratification, more freedom, more flexibility, more time off, more control over their schedules
  • They are also less tolerant - of authority, of expectations of self-sacrifice, of work that doesn't give them a sense of purpose, of situations that lack choice and options
  • Even those of us who are boomers are looking for alternatives - seeking more professional fulfillment, greater meaning for the years of work that remain, relief from the "grind", less stress OR perhaps greater reward for the stress that is innate in being a physician. 

How then should you view your physician career?

The signs are pointing to a path that is far from linear. Instead, the physician career of the future is more likely to be comprised of a patchwork of opportunities, some sequential, others simultaneous, in which you will be offered the chance to exercise a wide range of skills:

  • clinical
  • administrative
  • leadership and managerial
  • analytic
  • research-oriented
  • communication, both written and verbal
  • technological
  • inventive and innovative
  • entrepreneurial
  • consultative 

Each is a distinctive skill set that you might want to begin honing.

Does this prediction make you anxious? Or does this thrill you?

I find it rich with creative potential!

A forthcoming attraction in a couple of days -- my "Conversations with Trailblazers" podcast interview with a general surgeon who has truly sculpted a physician career of the future...

Friday
Feb102012

Your physician business website needs simple SEO strategies

How much business does your physician business website deliver to your door?

Do you even know?

My first website was admired for its good looks but I can't honestly claim it ever drove a single client to my doorstep.

Now, whereas I kinda like how The Entrepreneurial MD looks, that isn't what matters to me any more. How it performs as a relationship- and business-building tool is what really counts.

The reason I value this so much is that marketing can be very expensive. Ads, booths at health fairs or conferences, 4-color brochures, even traveling to places to give speaking presentations for no fee or small honorariums -- all this adds up. 

As my understanding grew of how the Internet and search engines work, I learned some important strategies to get business via that Internet doorway. Once your website is up and paid for, if you are willing to use some of your time in ways I'm about to suggest, your marketing costs will plummet, just like mine did.

1. Woo the search engines as vigorously as you woo visitors and prospects

I didn't understand anything about search engines when I first launched a website. But through somewhat painful experience and lots of reading of books like eBoot Camp, Mastering On-line Marketing and The New Rules of Marketing & PR, I began to appreciate the power of words to woo people AND search engines - how you use them, where you place them on your website or on-line content, and how create links from and to authoritative content elsewhere. 

2. Have your article or page title embrace your key words 

The "key" to keywords becomes the secret to unlocking the door to your website. Research one main keyword or keyword phrase you want to use for each page on your website or article on your blog. Include them in the title of your content as close to the beginning of the title as possible. The key is that they should show up somewhere appear in the title.

3. Use hyperlinks throughout your page or article. 

Linking is the fundamental basis of the web. Search engines want to know you’re sufficiently “connected” with other pages and content, so linking out to other pages matters when it comes to search engine optimization.
Here are some “rules of thumb” for linking based on generally accepted best practices:
  • Link to relevant content fairly early in the body copy
  • Link to relevant pages approximately every 120 words of content
  • Link to relevant interior pages of your site or other sites
  • Link with naturally relevant anchor text
Again, these are guidelines related to current best practices. Don’t get hung up on rules; focus on the intent behind what search engines are looking for – quality search results for people.
4. Use some of the excellent tools out there to make organic SEO easy
 

A favorite tool that I use without fail for every blog post now, is Copyblogger Media's Scribe software (this is an affiliate link). The goal is to write a post or article that you can then have analyzed, at the push of an on-line button, from the perspective of a search engine indexing "bot", showing how your copywriting would be perceived by the search engines. Naturally, as a competitive physician, my goal is to score 100% every time! What I love about the tool is the accompanying education AND opportunity to link to other authoritative sites on the web without having to do all that research myself!

They also offer a useful free report teaching principles of SEO - not that mysterious once you have read this stuff and used this tool!


Okay, time to analyze this post and see how I did :-)          (Yay - I got 100% first time!!!)